The SOFA agreement is complemented by another agreement specifically for the six NATO countries (including Great Britain and the United States) that have a permanent military presence in Germany, the Supplementary Agreement (or SA). The SOFA was signed in 1951 and the SA was signed in 1959 and last updated in 1998 at the end of the Cold War. With its 83 articles, the SA to SOFA is much more detailed than SOFA itself (with 20 articles in Roman numerals – z.B XX), and most often it is confused with the SOFA itself. The political issue of SOFAs is complicated by the fact that many host countries have mixed feelings about foreign bases on their soil, and calls to renegotiate SOFA are often combined with calls for foreign troops to withdraw completely. Issues of different national practices may arise – while the United States and host countries generally agree on what a crime is, many U.S. observers believe that the host country`s justice systems provide defendants with much weaker protection than the United States. and that the courts of the host country may be subject to pressure from the population to pronounce a guilty verdict; In addition, U.S. soldiers who have been sent abroad should not be forced to give up the rights conferred on them by the Bill of Rights. On the other hand, observers from the host country, who have no local equivalent to the Bill of Rights, often believe that it is an unequivocal excuse to demand special treatment and that they resemble the extraterritorial agreements demanded by Western countries during colonialism. A host country where such a mindset is prevalent, South Korea, itself has strength in Kyrgyzstan and has negotiated a SOFA that grants its soldiers full immunity from prosecution by Kyrgyz authorities for any crime, far beyond the privileges that many South Koreans have challenged in their country`s SOFA with the United States. [11] The law may also apply to certain non-military foreign persons related to the visit of military forces (e.g.B. family members, civilian employees, etc.). Such laws often deal with issues such as criminal justice, the treatment of apprehended persons, who are foreign military personnel absent without leave, or military deserters, dual-risk situations, etc.

Some laws adopted by individual Governments may directly address these issues or serve as enabling legislation, so that separate visiting force agreements between a host country and other countries may have the force of res judicata. Depending on the legal climate in the host country, such enabling legislation may or may not be necessary. Some items are rationed because a separate agreement between Britain and Germany explicitly limits the amount of cigarettes and tobacco, whiskey, gin and coffee a person can buy duty-free, which is why your NAAFI Ration Card must be filled every time you buy these goods. . . .