Under the Bologna Process, 46 European countries are implementing a series of reforms aimed at creating an integrated European Higher Education Area by 2010. The signatories to the agreement have worked for greater coherence in areas such as closure structures, the transfer of services and quality systems. The procedure, an intergovernmental agreement between the EU and third countries, does not have the status of EU legislation. Since the Bologna Declaration is not a treaty or convention, the signatory States have no legal obligations; Participation and cooperation are voluntary. The Bologna Process is a series of ministerial meetings and agreements between European countries to ensure the comparability of standards and quality of university degrees. [1] This procedure created the European Higher Education Area within the framework of the Lisbon Recognition Convention. It is named after the University of Bologna, where the Bologna Declaration was signed in 1999 by education ministers from 29 European countries. The process was opened to other countries in the framework of the Council of Europe`s European Cultural Convention[2] and government meetings were held in Prague (2001), Berlin (2003), Bergen (2005), London (2007), Leuven (2009), Budapest-Vienna (2010), Bucharest (2012), Jerewan (2015) and Paris (2018). The main objective of the Bologna Agreement is to create a European Higher Education Area.

It promotes the mobility of students and researchers, increases the attractiveness of studying in Europe and facilitates the recognition of diplomas. The Bologna Agreement clarifies the importance of diplomas by separating the Bachelor`s and Master`s degrees and introducing the “Bachelor`s” and “Master`s” framework into education in the European countries that are signatories to the agreement. It also defines standard requirements, a standard rating scale, common transcription and quality assurance controls to ensure common practices and quality standards. The Bologna Process is a process to ensure the comparability of standards and quality of university degrees, which began on 19 June 1999, when ministers from 29 European countries met in Bologna to sign an important agreement, the Bologna Declaration, which officially marked the beginning of this process. Many of the association`s activities are devoted to the development of European policies and practices in the context of Bologna. The ITA addresses a wide range of key issues for the EHR and its universities, such as quality assurance, mobility, governance, financing, lifelong learning, student monitoring and employability, recognition and impact of international trade agreements on higher education. . . .